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Carlos Gallego (he/him) is an Associate Professor of English. Carlos is originally from the U.S.-Mexico border town of Nogales, AZ (raised on both sides of the border). He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1994, and afterward attended Stanford University where he received his doctorate in English literature in 2003. While finishing his dissertation, Carlos worked as an educator with at-risk middle school and high school students in central and south Tucson. His research interests include Chicano/a studies, 20th century American literature, comparative ethnic studies, philosophy and critical theory, and cultural studies. He has published work in the academic journals Arizona QuarterlyBiography, Aztlan, Cultural Critique and Western Humanities Review, and has also edited a special edition of the Arizona Quarterly on “Migration and Movement(s) in Chicana/o Literature.” His book, Chicana/o Subjectivity and the Politics of Identity: Between Recognition and Revolution, was published in 2011, and his most recent book, Dialectical Imaginaries: Materialist Approaches to U.S. Latino/a Literature in the Age of Neoliberalism (co-edited with Marcial González) was published in 2018. His current book project examines psychopathy and identitarianism in contemporary American culture.

And the O. C. and Patricia Boldt Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Humanities

Established in 1994 by Oscar C. Boldt and his wife Patricia Hamar Boldt, the Boldt chair is offered to a current St. Olaf faculty member whose scholarship and professional endeavors advance the teaching and learning of humanities at the baccalaureate level. Oscar Boldt is chairman of The Boldt Group, Inc., a family-owned consulting and construction firm headquartered in Appleton, Wisconsin since 1889. The Boldt Chair is awarded for terms of three years; prior holders are James Farrell (History), Carol Holly (English), Edward Langerak (Philosophy), Gordon Marino (Philosophy), Diana Postlethwaite (English), Solveig Zempel (Norwegian), John Barbour (Religion), Steve Reece (Classics), and Judy Kutulas (History).

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